RESEARCH ARTICLE


The Effect of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction on the Progression of Osteoarthritis



Rory Norris 1, Pete Thompson 1, Alan Getgood*, 2
1 University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, UK
2 Fowler Kennedy Sport Medicine Clinic, 3M Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7, Canada


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Creative Commons License
© Norris et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Fowler Kennedy Sport Medicine Clinic, 3M Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7, Canada; Tel: +1 519 933 1115; E-mail: agetgood@btinternet.com


Abstract

Anterior cruciate ligament rupture (ACL) is a common injury, particularly among young sporting adults. Early onset osteoarthritis (OA) can be a devastating and difficult to manage consequence of such an injury. The techniques for reconstructing the ACL are advancing all the time, but the effect that this has on the progression of OA is less well understood. Many factors affect the development of OA following an ACL injury, including direct and indirect trauma to the articular cartilage, associated meniscal injuries, chronic tibiofemoral joint instability, and multiple enzymatic pathways. This review will summarize the current evidence surrounding each of these areas, and describe some of the recent developments that may have an impact on the management of these injuries in the future.

Keywords: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, osteoarthritis, knee.