RESEARCH ARTICLE


Treatment of Infected Hip Arthroplasty



Philippe Hernigou*, 1, 2, C.-H. Flouzat-Lachianette2, R. Jalil2, Sobrinho Uirassu Batista3, I. Guissou2, A. Poignard2
1 University Paris XII
2 Hôpital Henri Mondor, 94010 Creteil, France
3 Hospital Edgar Santos, University Federal of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil


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Creative Commons License
© Hernigou et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Hôpital Henri Mondor, 94010 Creitel, France; Tel: 33.1.49.81.26.01; Fax: 33.1.49.81.26.08; E-mail: philippe.hernigou@wanadoo.fr


Abstract

The clinical outcomes of a consecutive series of deep total joint infections treated with a prosthesis retaining protocol were reviewed. The treatment of deep periprosthetic joint infections is challenging. In recent years, two-stage exchange arthroplasty has emerged as the gold standard for successful elimination of infection. With success rates averaging 82% to 96%, this treatment method has both the highest and most consistent rate of infection eradication. Another alternative in the treatment of the deep periprosthetic infection is the single-stage exchange arthroplasty. Successful eradication of infection after single-stage exchange arthroplasty has been reported to average from 60% to 83% after total hip infections. While both the single and two-stage exchange arthroplasty are viable treatment options, they are associated with negative factors such as they are time consuming, expensive, and may entail a 6- to 12-week period with a minimally functioning extremity after prosthesis removal. This paper reports the general principles of management, the treatment of acute infection occurring in the postoperative period or later, and the treatment of chronic infection by exchange arthroplasty or resection arthroplasty.

Keywords: Arthroplasty, joint infection, antibiotics.