REVIEW ARTICLE


Managing Bony Defects of the Shoulder Joint that Occur in Association with Dislocation



Jonathan Brian Yates*, Muhammad Naghman Choudhry, Mohammad Waseem
Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Ringgold standard institution - Trauma and Orthopaedics Blackpool, Blackpool, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, UK


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© 2017 Yates et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Ringgold standard institution - Trauma and Orthopaedics Blackpool, Blackpool, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland UK; Tel: 07813180982; E-mail: jonathan_yates@hotmail.co.uk


Abstract

Background:

Defects to the articular surface of the humeral head have been known to be associated with shoulder dislocation since the 19th century. It wasn't until 1934 that the first description of the ubiquitous compression fracture of the posterolateral humeral head that occurs with traumatic anterior instability appeared. From 1940, this defect became referred to as a Hill-Sachs lesion after the investigators who reported the condition. The significance of, and therefore treatment of, these and other such bony defects around the shoulder joint has been hotly debated.

Methods:

We reviewed the available current literature to determine and report on the most up to date concepts and treatment techniques being used to manage bony defects of the shoulder.

Results:

Numerous surgical options have been proposed to manage bony defects of the shoulder, including a variety of defect-filling procedures, with good outcomes. However, the small numbers and diversity of case mix makes for difficult comparisons.

Conclusion:

We are currently developing a greater appreciation of how both the humeral and glenoid defects interact and therefore should be assessed and addressed simultaneously in order to improve patient outcomes. More research and collaboration is needed to determine the optimal method of assessing and managing these patients.

Keywords: Hill-Sachs lesion, Shoulder dislocation, Glenoid defects, Shoulder stability, Glenoid track theory, Shoulder surgery.