Short, Medium and Long Term Complications After Total Anatomical Shoulder Arthroplasty



T.M. Gregory1, 2, *, B. Boukebous1, J. Gregory3, J. Pierrart1, E. Masemjean
1 Upper Limb and orthopaedic surgery department, Avicenne Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, University Paris 13, Paris, France
2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College, London, UK
3 Upper Limb Surgery Unit, European Hospital Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France
4 Department of Radiology, European Hospital Georges Pompidou, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, University Paris Descartes, Paris, France


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© 2017 Gregory et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Service de chirurgie orthopédique et traumatologique, Hôpital Avicenne, 125 route de Stalingrad, 93000 Bobigny, France, Tel: +33-1-4895-5314; Fax: +33-1-4895-5319; E-mail: thomas.gregory@aphp.fr


Abstract

Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) is an effective approach for the treatment of a variety of clinical conditions affecting the shoulder, including osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis and osteonecrosis, and the number of TSA implanted has grown exponentially over the past decade. This review gives an update of the major complications, mainly infections, instability and loosening, encountered after TSA, based on a corpus of recent publications and a dynamic approach: The review focuses on the causes of glenoid loosening, which account for 80% of the complication, and underlines the importance of glenoid positioning in the recovery of early shouder function and in the long term survival rate of TSA.

Keywords: Arthroplasty, Shoulder, Arthroplasty, Replacement, Loosening, Glenoid placement, Radiolucent lines.