RESEARCH ARTICLE


Microgeodic Disease Affecting the Fingers and Toes in Childhood: A Case Report



Tomonori Tetsunaga*, Hirosuke Endo, Kazuo Fujiwara, Tomoko Tetsunaga, Toshifumi Ozaki
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Hospital, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558, Japan


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© Tetsunaga et al.; Licensee Bentham Open

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-NC 4.0) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Hospital, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kitaku, Okayama 700-8558, Japan; Tel: 81-86-235-7273; Fax: 81-86-223-9727; E-mail: tomonori_t31@yahoo.co.jp


Abstract

Microgeodic disease is a disease of unknown etiology that affects the fingers and toes of children, with ≥ 90% of cases involving the fingers alone. We present a rare case of microgeodic disease affecting an index finger and two toes simultaneously in a 7-year-old girl. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed multiple small areas of osteolysis in the middle phalanges of the left index finger, hallux, and second toe. Microgeodic disease was diagnosed from X-ray and MRI findings, and conservative therapy involving rest and avoidance of cold stimuli was provided. Although pathological fractures occurred in the course of conservative treatment, the affected finger healed under splinting without any deformity of the finger.

Keywords: Childhood, Conservative therapy, Finger, Microgeodic disease, Stress fracture, Toe.