RESEARCH ARTICLE


Current Concepts in Orthopedic Management of Multiple Trauma



Fatih Kucukdurmaz 1, Pouya Alijanipour*, 2
1 Clinic of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bezmialem Vakif University, Istanbul, Turkey
2 Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA


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Creative Commons License
© Kucukdurmaz and Alijanipour; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the 125 South 9th Street, Suite #1000, Philadelphia, PA 19103, USA; Tel: 267-339-3736; Fax: 267-339-3696; E-mail: pouya@alijanipour.com


Abstract

Multiple trauma patients frequently present challenging clinical scenarios with musculoskeletal injuries being the most common indications for surgical procedures in these patients. Despite our substantial knowledge, a universally approved objective definition for “multiple trauma” is yet to be delineated. Several controversial aspects of economics, pathophysiology, animal models, diagnosis, management and outcome of patients with multiple trauma have recently been explored and although some progress has been made, it seems that the available evidence is still inconclusive in some occasions. This manuscript revisits several current concepts of multiple trauma that have been the focus of recent investigation. We aim to provide the reader with an updated perspective based on the most recently published literature in the field of multiple trauma.

Keywords: Damage control, early total care, fracture, multiple trauma, orthopedics, sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome.