RESEARCH ARTICLE


Anatomical Localization of Lister’s Tubercle and its Clinical and Surgical Importance



İsmail Ağır*, 1, Mahmut Nedim Aytekin2, Fatih Küçükdurmaz3, Servan Gökhan4, Umut Yücel Çavuş4
1 Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Adıyaman University Training and Research Hospital, Adıyaman, Turkey
2 Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Atatürk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
3 Clinic of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bezmi Alem Foundation University School of Medicine, 34093, Istanbul, Turkey
4 Department of Emergency Medicine, Dışkapı Yıldırım Beyazıt Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey


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© Ağır et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/) which permits unrestrictive use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Adıyaman University Training and Research Hospital, Adıyaman, Turkey; Tel: +90(416)2161015; Fax: +90(416)2162659; E-mail: iagir@hotmail.com


Abstract

The dorsal tubercle of the radius, once called Lister’s tubercle, is used as a landmark in wrist arthroscopy, wrist joint injections, and similar surgical and clinical procedures. However, there is no useful information in the reference anatomy books and literature. The aim of this study was to identify the anatomical localization of Lister’s tubercle on the dorsum of radius in relation to the radial styloid process and the ulnar notch of radius and to demonstrate the clinical and surgical importance of these relationships. We studied 20 dried cadaver radius specimens. The distances from Lister’s tubercle to the radial styloid process and to the ulnar notch were measured by using a digital micrometer caliber and the ratio of the two measures was calculated. The dorsal tubercle of the radius is variable in position and can be either closer to the radial styloid process or to the ulnar notch. The present study showed that in 11 of the radii the dorsal tubercle of the radius was nearer to the radial styloid process than the ulnar notch, while in 9 subjects it was nearer to the ulnar notch. This anatomical variation may be relevant for wrist injections, wrist artroscopy or wrist surgery.

Keywords:: Distal radius fracture, extensor pollicis longus, Lister’s tubercle, screw penetration..