RESEARCH ARTICLE


Consultation of Orthopaedics Cases Using Multimedia Messaging Services



Vivek Eranki*, Justin Munt, Ming J Lim, Robert Atkinson
Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma, Modbury Public Hospital, 41-69 Smart Road, Modbury, SA 5092, Australia


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Creative Commons License
© Eranki et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, 28 Woodville Road, Woodville South, SA 5011, Australia; Tel: +61 415 179 050; Fax: 61 8 8121 9294; E-mail: vivek.eranki@me.com


Abstract

Background:

Frequently, radiological data is transferred verbally between the Emergency Department (ED) and orthopaedic registrar. Given the different language skills and medical experience of health staff, there is often a limit to the adequacy of the verbal description that could lead to suboptimal patient care. This study proposes that concurrent review of MMS teleradiology with traditional verbal reporting results in a significant therapeutic benefit.

Methods:

Case notes of 40 patients who presented to ED were reviewed. Images were captured and sent to an Orthopaedic registrar along with a brief clinical synopsis. Information was collected on the diagnosis of the MMS radiograph, need for urgent admission and management plan outlined to ED.

Results:

Correct diagnosis was made in 27 of 40 cases. Using the latest technology available, MMS teleradiology had 79% sensitivity, 83% specificity and an accuracy of 80%. 50% of paediatric fractures and 60% of undisplaced fractures were diagnosed successfully.

Conclusion:

MMS teleradiology is not suitable by itself as a remote diagnostic tool. However, when combined with existing clinical practice, it is effective in screening patients, enhances confidence in decision making and communication between doctors.

Keywords: MMS teleradiology, teleradiology, remote consults, remote orthopaedic consults and image transfer.