RESEARCH ARTICLE


Brucellosis Suspicion is the Most Important Criterion for Diagnosis Particularly in Endemic Regions



Baris Yilmaz1, Guzelali Ozdemir1, Erdem Aktas2, Baran Komur3, *, Serdar Alfidan4, Serdar Memisoglu5, Tahir Mutlu Duymuş3
1 Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
2 Dr. A. Yurtaslan Ankara Onkology Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
3 Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
4 Private Sifa Hospital, Isparta, Turkey
5 Private Primer Hospital, Gaziantep, Turkey


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© Yilmaz et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-NC 4.0) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Turgut Ozal St. Halkali No. 1, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; Tel: +90-212-5574000; Fax: +90-212-5714290; E-mail: barankomur@gmail.com


Abstract

Introduction:

Brucellosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that remains endemic in developing countries. The purpose of this study is to emphasize the need for considering brucellosis as a diagnosis, since this disease has a high risk of complications among young patients when not treated appropriately.

Methodology:

A total of 88 brucellosis cases with blood cultures that were positive for the pathogen were evaluated retrospectively in this study.

Results:

The patients included 33 males (37.5%) and 55 females (62.5%) with a median age of 8.9 years (range: 5-14 years). A total of 43.1% (n=38) of the cases included occupational exposure to animals as a possible infection source. The consumption of raw milk products, especially cheese, was present in 52.2% (n=46) of the cases. Clinically, 55 of the cases were acute (62.5%), 23 of the cases were subacute (26.2%) and 10 of the cases were chronic (11.3%). The distribution of the joint pain complaints was as follows: 62.5% (n=55) of patients reported hip pain, 22.7% (n=20) of patients reported knee pain, 11.4% (n=10) of patients reported lumbar-back pain and 3.4% (n=3) of patients reported pain in other joints. A total of 59.1% (n=52) of the cases had been examined by another doctor at least once and mistreated.

Conclusion:

Complication rates and the rate of chronic infection increase with delayed diagnosis, and clinical doubt is the most important criterion for diagnosis, particularly in endemic regions.

Keywords: Brucella, brucellosis, brucellosis in children, joint pain.